KIM JESTEŚMY REDAKCJA MARKETING DYSTRYBUCJA OGŁOSZENIA LISTY DO REDAKCJI KONTAKT 24 marzec 2017
E-WYDANIE
PUBLICYSTYKA
REPORTAŻ
LUDZIE I MIEJSCA
TAKIE CZASY
CZAS PRZESZŁY
CZAS TO PIENIĄDZ
DRUGI BRZEG
CZAS NA WYSPIE
AKTUALNOŚCI
FAWLEY COURT
PAN ZENOBIUSZ
DOBRE, BO POLSKIE
SYLWETKI
LONDYN W SUBIEKTYWIE
OPOWIADANIA LONDYŃSKIE
ROZMOWA
LISTY DO REDAKCJI
KULTURA
RECENZJA
SYLWETKI
ROZMOWA
CO SIĘ DZIEJE
FELIETONY
KRYSTYNA CYWIŃSKA
ANDRZEJ LICHOTA
WACŁAW LEWANDOWSKI
GRZEGORZ MAŁKIEWICZ
V.VALDI
SPORT
AKTUALNOŚCI
RELACJA
ROZMOWA
FELIETON
GALERIA
PODRÓŻE
PO LONDYNIE
PO WYSPIE
POLSKIE DROGI
PO ŚWIECIE
W CZASIE I PRZESTRZENI
CZAS NA RELAKS
ZDROWIE POLECAMY
NA ŁAWECZCE
MANIA GOTOWANIA
KRZYŻÓWKA
KRONIKA ABSURDU
NA KOŃCU JĘZYKA
TO I OWO
ARTERIA
ARTYŚCI
GALERIA
EWA OBROCHTA
BASIA LAUTMAN
BEATA KOZŁOWSKA
WOJCIECH SOBCZYŃSKI
RYSZARD SZYDŁO
PAWEŁ KORDACZKA
MARIA KALETA
MAREK BORYSEWICZ
KRZYSZTOF MALSKI
KONRAD GRABOWSKI
JUSTYNA KABAŁA
IWONA ZAJĄC
ELZBIETA PIEKACZ
ELZBIETA CHOJAK
ELA CIECIERSKA
CAROLINA KHOURI
ANIA PIENIĄŻEK
AGNIESZKA KOWAL
A.HANDZEL-KORDACZKA
ANDRZEJ KRAUZE
ANDRZEJ LICHOTA
DAMIAN CHROBAK
GRZEGORZ LEPIARZ
SŁAWEK BLATTON
ANDRZEJ MARIA BORKOWSKI
PAWEŁ WĄSEK
MARCIN DUDEK
JOANNA SZWEJ-HAWKIN
DANUTA SOŁOWIEJ
TOMASZ STANDO
AGNIESZKA STANDO
OLGA SIEŃKO
FOTOREPORTAŻ
AGATA HAMILTON
JOANNA CIECHANOWSKA




FATHER ”OJCIEC” JÓZEF JARZĘBOWSKI OF FAWLEY COURT
2014.09.09 / Mirek Malevski
TAGI:
Share |
A GREAT MAN WITH A GREAT DREAM SCANDALOUSLY BETRAYED

Great men have great dreams. The Polish born Father Józef Jarzębowski (1897-1964) was one such good and great man. Soldier, priest, scholar, and poet. His dream, his life’s work hand in hand with émigré Poles was Fawley Court, where he founded both school and museum. The school Divine Mercy College (Kolegium Bożego Miłosierdzia), the unique Polish émigré museum, remembered in his name, and later Fawley Court’s Tatra mountain-styled, Grade II listed St Anne’s Church, it’s foundation stone blessed by Cardinal Karol Wojtyła, later Pope John Paul II, founded and built by Prince Stanisław Radziwiłł, was all part of Father Józef’s great dream, and grand vision. Fawley Court represents an Anglo-Polish place of education, culture, shrine, peaceful retreats, and solace – the protector with the museum of Polish history and values.

Fawley Court, that beautiful part of England that is forever Poland, this year, 13th September 2014, commemorates the 50th anniversary of Father Jarzębowski’s sudden death at Herisau, Switzerland.

In early August 1964, Fr Józef delivered a eulogy at the church of St Andrzej Bobola, London, celebrating the 100th anniversary of the death of his, and Poland’s national hero Romuald Traugutt (1826-1864). The sermon was transmitted live, worldwide by Radio Free Europe.

Just a month later, in early September 1964 this brave, remarkable man, aged almost seventy, travelled from his beloved Fawley Court to Herisau to rest, recuperate, and then to open the General Melchior Langiewicz military exhibition at the nearby famous émigré Poles Rapperswill Museum. Freedom fighter, and revolutionary, General Langiewicz was Fr Józef’s and Poland’s favourite son, thanks to his heroic part in the January 1863 uprising against the Russians. In 1865, the exiled, colourful, General Langiewicz also made his way from Switzerland to England, and was part of the émigré political circle, the Ognisko Rewolucjonistów Polskich. In 1873 Langiewicz married an English girl Suzanna Berry. He died in 1887 in Turkey, and is buried in the English Crimea War Cemetery at Constantinople.

Alas, Fr Józef’s personal Langiewicz exhibition opening, period of rest, recovery, and recuperation from illness was not to be.

Stricken with a heart attack, Fr Józef was taken from the plane and straight to hospital where he died. In accordance with his own clear testamentary wishes, that of his extensive family, and those of émigré Poles worldwide, there was the return to Fawley Court of Fr Józef’s coffin, and the historic homecoming-burial, on 26 September 1964.

Father Józef’s funeral ceremony was attended by near a thousand people. These included generals, bishops, politicians, and academicians all paying homage to this brave soldier, priest, scholar, teacher-educationalist, poet, and Fawley Court Museum founder. We all, schoolboys, teachers and émigré Poles, witnessed this homecoming, the final stage of Fr Jarzębowski’s global odyssey, the return of a loyal Soldier of Christ and patriot of two nations, Poland and Britain, to his chosen, adopted Motherland – England.

Born on 27 November 1897 in Warsaw, to well educated, nobly, religious parents. Fr Józef’s father passed away when he was six, and it was left to his Mother (Franciszka née Ablemowicz, 1868-1941), to inspire in him a love for learning, for his country, for his fellow human beings, and for God.

Never enjoying the best of health – in 1925 he had to cut short his studies at the Univesity of Lublin due to severe bronchitis – the young Józef Jarzębowski nonetheless showed strength of character, scholarship, indomitable will, and a fierce independence. At grammar school, (Gimnazjum Zamoyskiego) when the Russian teacher declared that after the partitions, Poland had been erased from the map of Europe forever, the young Jarzębowski rebelliously declared this as folly, and wholly untrue – a very serious political misdemeanor. Poland was, is, and always will be, he yelled. He was expelled. A new school for him under Imperial Russia was impossible to find in Poland, and it was only with the aid of the Capuchin Fathers, that he eventually found school at Oświęcim in south-west Poland within the Austrian partition.

Much revered for his spiritual authority, Father Józef on behalf of Catholic Warsaw, was already in 1919 welcoming from France Gen. Józef Haller (1873-1960). They became firm friends. In 1920, with the Bolsheviks surrounding Warsaw, the 23 year old Józef Jarzębowski immediately joined the Polish army in the historic fight against the communist intruder repelling the Soviet threat for the whole of Western Europe in the battle called Cud nad Wisłą.

Born of this experience was a passion for teaching, and caring for his pupils. Before WW2 Fr Józef was a teacher at the famous Marian Bielany School, Warsaw. Throughout his life, he shared this ennobling educationalist gift, together with his inspirational historical nose for researching, saving, and collecting things Polish, or otherwise – be they museum artefacts, paintings, statues, letters, bibles, first edition books, medals or swords – with émigré Poles around the world, eventually preserving and concluding this life’s work, his Polonnia Odyssey at Fawley Court.

Fawley Court was Fr Józef’s life’s work. It was an endeavor supported in the 1950s and onwards by generous and enthusiastic help of émigré Poles. Survivors of WW2, and outcasts from their own country, Poland, for which they had battled on foreign soil, but now communist Soviet occupied. They began uncomplainingly building a fresh life in England. Embracing many of Poland’s fine traditions, it’s 1000-year history, religion, values and virtues, – some hopelessly romantic, some over gallant – the historic never-say-die Polish traits of justice and freedom, guided the Poles as they went about their business with grit and determination. Fr Józef fully understood these émigré Poles, himself having been a patriot refugee for most of his life.

With the tall, gaunt figure of the resilient, gentle, and cultivated Fr. Jarzębowski at the helm, Fawley Court became the focal point of everything Polish in England. In a determined act of combined spiritual and cultural solidarity (a spirit revived recently with the radical clean-out, and momentous victory at Ognisko/The Polish Hearth Club), an academically successful Polish Catholic boys school (1953), and an extraordinarily unique émigré Polish cultural-military museum was set up. A later addition (1971), with important relics, and museum pieces was the unique St Anne’s Church, with seventeen urns containing ashes of émigré Poles in the crypt columbarium, and of course the entombed bodies of founder Prince Stanisław Radziwiłł, and his son Albert Radziwiłł, all in the church crypt. Every year, for fifty years the émigré high point, attracting many thousands, was the traditional Fawley Court, Polish religious festival – Zielone Świątki (Whitsun Sunday).

Fr Józef was personal confessor at Brompton Oratory to General Władysław Anders, General Kopański, and other Polish officers. Doubtless lunch was then enjoyed around Gen. Anders special table, at the Polish Officers Mess, Ognisko, just around the corner. Fr Józef was a close friend of many at the ‘Cichociemni’ (Polish Secret Operations Unit – stationed at Fawley Court during WW2), and particularly of AK (Armia Krajowa/Home Army) member, Zdzisław Jeziorański, nephew of Jan Jeziorański, the ‘forgotten hero’ of the 1863 January Uprising.

Fr Józef’s life itself was a remarkable Odyssey. It took him from Warsaw, Poland, where he witnessed war, to around the globe, Lithuania, Siberia, Japan, USA, and Mexico, through a series of harrowing and life examining spiritual, religious and academic adventures – tribulations.

Father Józef was duly laid to rest on 26 September 1964 at Fawley Court’s St Anne’s Church cemetery. In fact, three years earlier on 11 June 1961, in keeping with Fr Józef’s wishes, and in agreement with the Marians, Polish Combatants Association, and the Polish Catholic Mission, planning permission for Fawley Court’s St Anne’s half-acre Polish Roman Catholic Cemetery was granted by Wycombe District Council, in response to the formal application of the Marian’s themselves, and their solicitors (to this day, Messrs Pothecary Witham Weld). The same solicitors, half a century later, inexplicably led the legal battle to exhume Fr Józef!

Fr Józef’s wishes in his own words were clear: My grave (within the cemetery, by the future St Anne’s Church), is to be on a mound overlooking Fawley Court’s sport’s field, and my body laid thus so that I can watch my boys playing football. Father Józef rested peaceably by St Anne’s Church, when came the scandalous exhumation betrayal.

Despite a monumental outcry, against a background of lengthy furious public protest, petitions to the British Government, MPs in the House of Commons, and court actions, all resisting this treacherous exhumation, the mercenary will of the incorrigible (new) Marians prevailed. Shockingly, under cover of darkness, on the night of 29 August 2012, Fr Józef’s body was furtively exhumed, and unceremoniously removed.

A mantle of utter disbelief descended on Polonia… But, is it, is this really the end of the matter, and the Marians’ philistine, selfish, grotesque drama? It would seem not.

Fresh evidence is emerging which suggests that the Marians, manically and mercenarily blinded by dollar and pound signs, under questionable, onerous, and almost certainly unlawful charity law sales conditions – in pursuit of the “exhumation licence”, may not have gone to the Ministry of Justice or the High Court with ‘clean hands’

In the course of this grotesque exhumation merry-go-round battle, indeed at times burlesque drama, the nadir, a real low-life was reached by the Marians in 2008/9. In a horrendous bid by the Marians to have Fr Józef cremated, things got confused and in his stead the name of the Marian trustee-priest, Wojciech Jasiński appears on the relevant form/letter as the candidate for a ‘living’ cremation! Was this a indicative of the clumsy, psychotic state of mind the Marians had/have collectively sank to?

In fact the Marians sank even lower. Fr Józef was a candidate for Beatification. Information on this intended process was displayed on the Marians’ own website, but only up until the announcement of the Fawley Court sale. Canon Law requires that the remains of a candidate for beatification remain intact, ready for examination. The Marians’ abhorrent attempt at Fr Józef’s cremation would have annulled this sacred process. What a betrayal!

„Nowy Czas” and FCOB now learn of the existence of an extensive family of the late Father Jarzębowski. The legal, next-of-kin, family argument presented to the Ministry of Justice by Jan Radziwiłł, eldest son of Prince Stanisław, resulted in the Marians being refused outright an exhumation certificate to remove the Prince from his resting place in the crypt at St Anne’s Church, Fawley Court. Indeed, Jan Radziwiłł has gone on record with the words, to the now fugitive Marian Trustee Wojciech Jasiński: That all hell will break loose! if Jasiński continues his threats, or the Marians go anywhere near his late Father’s, the Prince Radziwiłł’s entombed remains!

Are we soon to witness ‘all hell breaking loose’, and the heavens justly opening over the Marians’ scandalous betrayal of Father Józef Jarzębowski? The mountain of new evidence is certainly mounting, and it is certainly compelling...

Mirek Malevski
Chairman,
Fawley Court Old Boys/FCOB Ltd



OJCIEC JÓZEF JARZĘBOWSKI Z FAWLEY COURT, WIELKI CZŁOWIEK, KTÓRY MIAŁ WIELKIE MARZENIE - SKANDALICZNIE ZDRADZONY

Wielcy ludzie mają wielkie marzenia. Urodzony w Polsce Ojciec Józef Jarzębowski (1897-1964) był dobrym i wielkim człowiekiem. Żołnierz, ksiądz, uczony i poeta, którego marzeniem i dziełem życia, podobnie jak polskiej emigracji, była posiadłość Fawley Court, w której założył zarówno szkołę, jak i muzeum. Szkoła o nazwie Kolegium Bożego Miłosierdzia, wyjątkowe muzeum polskiej emigracji, nazwane jego imieniem, a później powstały w Fawley Court kościół św. Anny, nawiązujący do stylu podhalańskiego, uznany za zabytek drugiej klasy, którego kamień wgielny poświęcił kardynał Karol Wojtyła (przyszły papież Jan Paweł II). Ufundowany i zbudowany przez księcia Stanisława Radziwiłła, był częścią wielkiego marzenia i wielkiej wizji Ojca Józefa. Fawley Court to angielsko-polskie centrum edukacji i kultury, sanktuarium, spokojne miejsce medytacji i pocieszenia, w którym dzięki muzeum, chroni się pamięć o historii polskiej emigracji i jej wartościach.

I tak, Fawley Court, ta piękna, niegdyś spokojna część Anglii, która zawsze będzie Polską, w tym roku, 13 września 2014, upamiętnia 50-tą rocznicę nagłej śmierci Ojca Jarzębowskiego w Herisau, w Szwajcarii.

Na początku sierpnia 1964 roku Ojciec Józef wygłosił mowę w kościele Andrzeja Boboli w Londynie poświęconą setnej rocznicy śmierci swojego a zarazem polskiego bohatera narodowego, Romualda Traugutta (1826-1864). Kazanie było transmitowane na żywo na cały świat przez Radio Wolna Europa.

Zaledwie miesiąc później, na początku września 1964 roku, ten odważny, niezwykły człowiek, w wieku prawie siedemdziesięciu lat, wyjechał z ukochanego Fawley Court do Herisau aby odpocząć, zregenerować siły oraz aby dokonać otwarcia wystawy wojskowej poświęconej Generałowi Melchiorowi Langiewiczowi w pobliżu słynnego Muzeum Polskiego w Rapperswil. Bojownik o wolność i rewolucjonista, Generał „Dyktator” Langiewicz był ulubionym bohaterem Ojca Józefa i polskiej emigracji, dzięki heroicznej walce w powstaniu styczniowym 1863 roku przeciw Rosjanom. W 1865 roku, zmuszony do opuszczenia Polski Generał Langiewicz odbył podróż ze Szwajcarii do Anglii i dołączył do kręgu emigracji politycznej, „Ogniska Rewolucjonistów Polskich”. W 1873 r. Langiewicz poślubił angielską dziewczynę Suzannę Berry. Zmarł w 1887 roku w Turcji. Jest pochowany na angielskim Cmentarzu „Wojny Krymskiej” w Konstantynopolu. Niestety, nie było dane Ojcu Józefowi ani osobiście otworzyć wystawy poświęconej Langiewiczowi, ani też odpocząć, nabrać sił po chorobie.

Ojciec Józef doznał ataku serca i prosto z samolotu został zabrany do szpitala, w którym zmarł. Zgodnie z własnym wyraźnym pragnieniem („testamentem”) i pragnieniem jego licznej rodziny oraz Polonii na całym świecie, trumna z ciałem Ojca Józefa wróciła do Fawley Court i 26 września 1964 roku odbył się jego historyczny pogrzeb na ziemi, która stała się jego domem.

Na pogrzeb Ojca Józefa przybyło niemal tysiąc osób. Byli wśród nich generałowi, biskupi, politycy i nauczyciele akademiccy. Wszyscy oni składali hołd temu dzielnemu żołnierzowi, kapłanowi, uczonemu, nauczycielowi i pedagogowi, poecie i założycielowi muzeum w Fawley Court. My wszyscy, uczniowie, nauczyciele i emigranci z Polski, byliśmy świadkami powrotu do domu, świadkami końcowego etapu światowej Odysei Polonijnej Ojca Jarzębowskiego, powrotu wiernego Żołnierza Chrystusa i patrioty dwóch narodów, Wielkiej Brytanii i Polski, do swojej wybranej, adoptowanej Ojczyzny – Anglii.

Ojciec Józef Jarzębowski urodził się 27 listopada 1897 roku w Warszawie, jako dziecko dobrze wykształconych, religijnych rodziców. Jego ojciec zmarł, kiedy miał sześć lat i to zadaniem jego matki (Franciszki, z domu Ablemowicz, 1868-1941) było wszczepieniu mu miłości do nauki, do ojczyzny, do bliźnich i do Boga.

Będąc zawsze słabego zdrowia – w 1925 roku musiał przerwać studia na Uniwersytecie w Lublinie z powodu ciężkiego zapalenia oskrzeli – młody Józef Jarzębowski pokazał jednak siłę charakteru, chęć zdobywania wiedzy, nieugiętą wolę i niepohamowane dążenie do niezależności. W gimnazjum (Gimnazjum Zamoyskiego), w 1918 roku, kiedy rosyjski nauczyciel stwierdził, że po rozbiorach Polska została wymazana z mapy Europy na zawsze, młody Jarzębowski buntowniczo oświadczył, że to twierdzenie głupie i całkowicie nieprawdziwe – co stanowiło bardzo poważne wykroczenie polityczne. „Polska była, jest i zawsze będzie” – krzyknął. Został wydalony ze szkoły. Nie było dla niego możliwości znalezienia nowej szkoły w Polsce, będącej pod jarzmem carskiej Rosji i tylko dzięki pomocy Ojców Kapucynów znalazł ostatecznie szkołę w Oświęcimiu, w zaborze austriackim.

Niezwykle szanowany za swój duchowy autorytet, Ojciec Józef, w imieniu katolickiej Warszawy, już w 1919 roku, po zakończeniu I wojny światowej, witał powracającego z Francji Generała Józefa Hallera (1873-1960). Stali się bliskimi przyjaciółmi. W 1920 roku, kiedy bolszewicy okrążyli Warszawę, 23 letni Józef Jarzębowski natychmiast przyłączył się do polskiej armii w jej historycznej walce z komunistycznym najeźdźcą, walcząc z sowieckim zagrożeniem podczas „Cudu nad Wisłą”.

Z tego doświadczenia narodziło się u niego zamiłowanie do nauki i troska o swoich uczniów. Przez całe życie, dzielił się tym uszlachetniającym, pedagogicznym darem i zarażał pasją do historycznych badań, zachowywania i gromadzenia rzeczy, które były polskie, lub też w inny sposób związane na całym świecie z Polonią – zbiory muzealne, obrazy, rzeźby, listy, biblie, pierwsze wydania książek, ordery i miecze na całym świecie. Zwieńczeniem jego życia, jego „Polonijnej Odysei”, było Fawley Court.

Fawley Court było dziełem życia Ojca Józefa. Było to przedsięwzięcie od 1950 r. bezinteresownie, wielkodusznie i entuzjastycznie wspierane przez polską emigrację. Ocaleni z II wojny światowej a odrzuceni przez własną ojczyznę, Polskę, za którą walczyli na obcej ziemi, a która teraz znalazła się pod okupacją komunistycznego Związku Sowieckiego, polscy emigranci zaczynali od nowa budować swoje nowe życie w Anglii. W ich wytrwałym i pełnym determinacji zmaganiu się z trudami dnia codziennego drogowskazem były wielkie polskie tradycje, 1000-letnia historia, religia, wartości i cnoty – niektóre beznadziejnie romantyczne, inne przesadnie szarmanckie – polskie „nigdy się nie poddawaj”, sprawiedliwość i wolność . Ojciec Józef doskonale rozumiał polskich emigrantów, samemu będąc patriotą na wygnaniu przez większą część życia.

Kierowany przez wysoką, szczupłą postać prężnego, delikatnego i wykształconego Ojca Jarzębowskiego ośrodek Fawley Court stał się najważniejszym miejscem dla każdego Polaka w Anglii. Dzięki wytrwałej pracy opartej na duchowej i kulturowej solidarności (w duchu, który niedawno pięknie odżył dzięki radykalnym zmianom oraz doniosłemu zwycięstwu w Ognisku/The Polish Hearth Club), powstała odnosząca sukcesy akademickie Polska Szkoła Katolicka dla chłopców (1953) oraz wyjątkowe muzeum kulturalno-wojskowe polskiej emigracji. Później powstałym obiektem (1971), w którym znalazły się ważne pamiątki i muzealia, był niezwykły kościół św. Anny, z siedemnastoma urnami, zawierającymi w kolumbarium polskie prochy (koszty zostały pokryte przez polską emigrację). W grobowcu zostało złożone ciało założyciela, księcia Stanisława Radziwiłła oraz Alberta Radziwiłła. Każdego roku, przez pięćdziesiąt lat, ważnym wydarzeniem dla emigracji, przyciągającym wiele tysięcy osób, było tradycyjne polskie święto religijne – Zielone Świątki.

Będąc całe życie spowiednikiem, Ojciec Józef pełnił tę posługę jako osobisty spowiednik Generała Władysława Andersa, Generała Kopańskiego i polskich oficerów w Brompton Oratory. Obiad jadano wtedy przy specjalnym stole Generała Andersa, w oddalonym o dwa kroki Ognisku Polskim. Ojciec Józef był bliskim przyjacielem wielu „Cichociemnych” (polska jednostka działań dywersyjnych stacjonująca w Fawley Court), a szczególnie cichociemnego, będącego żołnierzem Armii Krajowej, Zdzisława Jeziorańskiego, bratanka Jana Jeziorańskiego, „zapomnianego bohatera” powstania styczniowego z roku 1863.

Życie Ojca Józefa było niezwykłą „Odyseją Polonijną”. Los prowadził go przez cały świat, z Warszawy, gdzie był świadkiem wojny, przez Litwę, Syberię, do Japonii, USA i Meksyku, i nie szczędził mu wielu wstrząsających, będących prawdziwym życiowym egzaminem, duchowych, religijnych i naukowych przygód i cierpień.

Ojciec Józef został pochowany 26 września 1964 roku na cmentarzu kościoła św. Anny w Fawley Court. Trzy lata wcześniej, 11 czerwca 1961 roku, zgodnie z wolą Ojca Józefa oraz w porozumieniu z Zakonem Marianów, SPK, Polską Misją Katolicką, Rada Powiatu (District Council) Wycombe udzieliła pozwolenia na utworzenie półhektarowego Polskiego Cmentarza Rzymsko-Katolickiego przy kościele św. Anny w Fawley Court, w odpowiedzi na formalny wniosek marianów i ich prawników z kancelarii Pothecary Witham Weld. (Ci sami prawnicy, pół wieku później, w niewytłumaczalny sposób prowadzili batalię prawną o ekshumację Ojca Józefa!).

Życzenie Ojca Józefa, wyrażone jego własnymi słowami, było jasne: „Mój grób (na cmentarzu, obok przyszłego kościoła św. Anny), ma znajdować się na kopcu z widokiem na boisko Fawley Court, a moje ciało ma być złożone w taki sposób, abym mógł patrzeć, jak moi chłopcy grają w piłkę nożną.”​​ Ojciec Józef spoczywał spokojnie obok kościoła św. Anny przez blisko pięćdziesiąt lat.

Mimo ogromnego oburzenia, wbrew długotrwałemu, zaciekłemu oporowi społecznemu, petycjom do rządu brytyjskiego, posłów w Izbie Gmin i działań sądowych, które miały powstrzymać tę zdradziecką ekshumację, zwyciężyła ślepa, uparta, wyrachowana wola niereformowalnych („nowych”) marianów. Pod osłoną ciemności, w nocy 29 sierpnia 2012 roku, liczący niemal pół wieku grób Ojca Józefa w Fawley Court został skandalicznie splądrowany. Jego ciało potajemnie ekshumowano i bezceremonialnie usunięto.

Cała Polonia przyjęła to z absolutnym niedowierzaniem. Ale czy to naprawdę koniec tej sprawy, tego kołtuńskiego, samolubnego, groteskowego dramatu, wywołanego przez marianów? Wydaje się że nie.

Pojawiają się nowe dowody, wskazujące, że marianie, maniakalnie i w trosce jedynie o swój interes, oślepieni wizją dolara i funta, na podstawie wątpliwych, zawikłanych i prawie na pewno niezgodnych z prawem warunków sprzedaży, opartych na przepisach dotyczących działalności charytatywnej – usiłując uzyskać „pozwolenie na ekshumację” mogli wcale nie mieć „czystych rąk” przedstawiając sprawę w Ministerstwie Sprawiedliwości i Sądzie Najwyższym. Przede wszystkim, będąc z pewnością wyświęconym na kapłana, czy Ojciec Józef rzeczywiście był członkiem „Kongregacji” Ojców Marianów? Jeśli nie, marianie będą mieli za co odpowiadać.

W trakcie tej groteskowej walki o ekshumację, która to walka rzeczywiście czasami przybierała formę burleski, marianie osiągnęli dno w 2008/2009 r. Składając przerażającą propozycję spopielenia szczątków Ojca Józefa, marianie popełnili błąd i w miejsce Ojca Józefa pojawiło się nazwisko marianina, księdza-powiernika, wciąż jeszcze żyjącego Wojciecha Jasińskiego, który w odpowiednim wniosku/piśmie pojawił się jako kandydata do spopielenia „za życia”! Czy to sztuczka, dzięki której miałaby nastąpić zamiana ciał czy też świadectwo paranoidalnego, psychotycznego stanu umysłu marianów?

W istocie marianie popadli w jeszcze głębsze szaleństwo. Ojciec Józef miał być beatyfikowany. Informacja o zamierzonym procesie beatyfikacji była zamieszczona na własnej stronie internetowej marianów, ale tylko do czasu ogłoszenia sprzedaży Fawley Court. Zgodnie z prawem kanonicznym szczątki osoby, która kandyduje do beatyfikacji, muszą pozostać nienaruszone, tak, aby mogły zostać przebadane. Zamierzony przez marianów odrażający akt spopielenia szczątków Ojca Józefa uniemożliwiłby tę świętą procedurę.

„Nowy Czas” i FCOB teraz dowiadują się o istnieniu znacznie bliższej, licznej rodziny zmarłego Ojca Jarzębowskiego. Prawny argument dotyczący najbliższych krewnych, przedstawiony Ministerstwu Sprawiedliwości przez Jana Radziwiłła, najstarszego syna księcia Stanisława, spowodował, że odmówiono marianom pozwolenia na ekshumację w celu usunięcia ciała księcia z jego miejsca spoczynku w krypcie w kościele św. Anny w Fawley Court. Odnotowano słowa Jana Radziwiłła skierowane do, ukrywającego się obecnie, powiernika marianów Wojciecha Jasińskiego: „Rozstąpi się piekło”, jeśli Jasiński będzie nadal stosować swoje groźby lub jeśli marianie pojawią się choćby w pobliżu złożonych w grobowcu szczątków jego zmarłego ojca, księcia Radziwiłła !

Czy zatem wkrótce będziemy świadkami „rozstąpienia się piekła” i niebios otwartych nad skandaliczną zdradą Ojca Józefa Jarzębowskiego dokonaną przez marianów? Nowych dowodów stale oczywiście przybywa.

Mirek Malevski
Przewodniczący,
Fawley Court Old Boys / FCOB Ltd.

Dodaj komentarz:
Autor:
Wpisz hasło z obrazka: (małymi literami)


REKLAMA
PODCASTY
...zobacz inne podcasty
ARTERIA
...zobacz archiwum Arterii
REKLAMA
ENGLISH PAGE
...zobacz inne artykuły
ANKIETA
Czy wyjeżdźasz na wakacje do Polski?
liczba głosów: 21636
Tak

18095
84%
Nie

3541
16%
...zobacz archiwum ankiet
WYSZUKIWANE TAGI

Polsport |adwokat wypadki drogowe Warszawa | liny nierdzewne | opieka Gliwice | zgrzewarka kondensatorowa | suplementy diety produkcja Omega
kuchnie na wymiar rybnik | układanie podłogi warszawa | rehabilitacja Radlin | badania kierowców Jastrzębie Zdrój | alpinizm przemysłowy